EXPERT SOLUTION: Assignment Details: The assignment gives you the opportunity to situate the organization (structure

Assignment Details:

The assignment gives you the opportunity to situate the organization (structure and social issue that is targeted) identify an organizational problem, challenge, or opportunity in your field placement (or human service organization you know well), determine a solution grounded in theory or practice model, strategize for implementing the solution (organizational change), and specify how you will evaluate/assess the change.

Your choice for the assignment/topic MUST BE AN ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUE (e.g. staff turner over, agency-wide communication dysfunction, etc.). You will follow the logic model format for this change provided in this syllabus.

ALL assignments should have the following: (1) The writing should be clear and concise. (2) Cite all references in the text. (3) Include a complete list of references at the end of the assignment. (4) Cite all references in standard American Psychological Association format. (5) DO NOT include identifying names of persons. 

The 5 written assignments are parts of the whole – each assignment will include the assignment that preceded it. You are required to revise the preceding assignment according to the instructor’s recommendations before adding it to the next assignment. 

Assignment I (3-4 pgs, not including the cover pg, reference pg, and appendix A chart) – provides the basis for analysis and understanding of the organization, describing the context of the organization within its marketplace, and the social issue it is tasked with addressing. (See Appendix A) 

Organization: Baltimore City Child Protective Services

Social Problem: Not enough placements for children in foster care

Websites that offer information: 

Child Protective Services

https://msa.maryland.gov/msa/mdmanual/36loc/bcity/html/bcitye.html#social

Please see the attachment for additional information! 

Assignment Details:

The written assignment gives you the opportunity to situate the organization (structure and social issue that is targeted) identify an organizational problem, challenge or opportunity in your field placement (or human service organization you know well), determine a solution grounded in theory or practice model, strategize for implementing the solution (organizational change), and specify how you will evaluate/assess the change.

Your choice for the paper/topic MUST BE AN ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUE (e.g. staff turner over, agency-wide communication dysfunction, etc.). You will follow the logic model format for this change provided in this syllabus.

ALL papers should have the following: (1) The writing should be clear and concise. (2) Cite all references in the text. (3) Include complete list of references at the end of the paper. (4) Cite all references in standard American Psychological Association format. (5) DO NOT include identifying names of persons.

The 5 written assignments are parts of whole – each paper will include the paper that preceded it. You are required to revise the preceding paper according to the instructor recommendations before adding it to the next paper.

Assignment I (3-4 pages) – provides the basis for analysis and understanding the organization, describing the context of the organization within its marketplace, and the social issue it is tasked with addressing. (See Appendix A

Organization Structure

40

Introduction – Introduce the agency/organization, type (public, not for profit, etc.)

10

Governance

5

Revenue Streams

5

Size (# employees, annual budget, etc.)

5

Structure (# departments, part of larger org., off-site centers, etc.)

5

Population served (typed, #s, salient issues)

5

Stakeholders (all internal & external who have a direct interest in the organization)

5

Social Problem – Urban Child Welfare

40

Introduction – social problem

5

definitions, as relevant

5

statistics on prevalence or incidence of the issue

5

studies that look at risk and protective factors (more than one source)

5

describe briefly the issues relevance to social work and

5

social work interventions that have been utilized

5

present briefly an evaluation of the effectiveness of those interventions

5

Significance of the Issue – describe why this is such a problem for families, group of communities

5

Composition

20

Details –Main ideas are clear and are well supported by detailed and accurate information.

5

Organization – The introduction is inviting, states the main topic, and provides an overview of the paper. Information is relevant and presented in a logical order. The conclusion is strong.

5

Word Choice – The author uses vivid words and phrases. The choice and placement of words seems accurate, natural, and not forced.

5

Sentence Structure, Grammar, Mechanics, & Spelling -All sentences are well constructed and have varied structure and length. The author makes no errors in grammar, mechanics.

5

Appendix A: Organizational Chart Template:

12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234
12345678901234567890123456789012123456789012345678901234567890121234

Dr. Susan Barkman
Purdue University
AGAD Room 229
615 W. State Street
W. Lafayette, IN. 47907-2053
765/494-8436
[email protected]

Utilizing the

LOGIC MODEL
for Program Design

and Evaluation

ID 270

2

Glossary of Important Outcome Measurement Terms

baseline – data about the condition or
performance prior to the educational
intervention

(i.e. statewide % of low-birth weight; number of
vandalism reports; standardized test scores; school
dropout rate; number of accidents involving teen
drivers; recidivism rate; water quality)

benchmarks – performance data used either
as a baseline against which to compare future
performance or as a marker to assess
progress towards a goal

(i.e., periodic behavior checklist ratings; amount of
debt; academic grades)

evaluation – the systematic collection and
analysis of information to determine the worth
of a curriculum, program or activity

input – resources that go into a program to
achieve its goals, outputs and outcomes

(i.e., staff, volunteers, time, money, materials,
equipment, technology, partners)

impact – the long-term outcomes of a program

(i.e., social, economic, civic or environmental
impact)

outcomes – end results or benefits the
participants get from a program. Outcomes
can be:

• intended or unintended
• positive or negative

Outcomes fall along a continuum from
immediate to short-term to long-term. Long-
term outcomes are called impact. Examples
are listed below.

immediate outcomes – awareness created,
knowledge gained, attitudes changed, skills
developed, aspirations sparked

short-term outcomes – behavior changed,
practice adopted, decisions made, policies
changed or adopted, social action initiated

long-term outcomes – social, economic, civic,
environmental impact

outcome indicators – the observable,
measurable characteristics or changes that
represent achievement of an outcome

(i.e., absenteeism, score on an attitude survey or
completed homework assignment could all be
indicators for developing a positive attitude towards
school)

outcome target – numerical objective for a
program’s level of achievement
(i.e., percent, number, quality rating)

outputs – activities, products, services, and
participation that result from the inputs

(i.e., activities such as workshops, camps,
curriculum, publications, media event, web site,
projects, test plots, field days, and the number,
characteristics, and reactions of participants)

qualitative methodology – methods that
examine, describe or interpret phenomena

(i.e., observation, open-ended interviewing, and
document review)

quantitative methodology – refers to an
approach involving the use of numerical
measurement and data analysis methodology

(i.e., standardized, structured data collection
including surveys, closed-ended interviews, tests
and behavior checklists)

reliability – the extent to which measures from
an instrument are consistent. Reliability is
usually measured by a Cronbach Alpha. The
closer an alpha is to 1.0, the more reliable the
instrument

( i.e., an instrument with a .85 is more reliable than
one with .65. No instrument can have a reliability of
1.00)

validity – the extent to which a measure from
an instrument actually captures the concept
being measured

3

Evaluation – What Is It?

Evaluation means different things to different
people and takes place in different contexts.
Although many definitions have been
developed, the one most appropriate for use
within the Extension context is:

“The systematic collection and analysis of
information to determine the worth of a
curriculum, program or activity.” (Alkin
1990)

The word systematic means the evaluation
must be planned as an integral part of the
design or planning process. It is not just an
“event” that occurs at the end.

Worth can be a measure of:
1. the quality or satisfaction level leading to

program improvement, or
2. the effectiveness as a means to

demonstrate the impact of the program or
that the targeted outcomes have been
achieved.

Both kinds of “worth” continue to be important
for Extension professionals. However because
of the increased accountability demands, this
manual will focus primarily on measuring the
impact of programs, otherwise called
“outcome evaluation.”

Why Measure Outcomes?

Basically, the answer to that question is to see
if programs really make a difference in the
lives of the participants and communities.

As you gather outcome data, it can be used in
a variety of ways:

• To help improve programs and
services.

• To be accountable in order to retain or
increase funding.

• To gain valuable information to use in
decision making and long range
planning.

• To focus programs that can really
make a difference for participants.

• To determine cost-effectiveness.

• To gain support from the community
to aid in sustainability.

• To gain public and professional
recognition as a quality program.

• To attract new participants
• To recruit and retain talented staff.
• To recruit and motivate volunteers.
• To take pride in accomplishment.

Remember an outcome measurement
provides an ongoing means for educators and
specialists to track the percent of participants
that achieved the targeted outcomes, but it
does not prove that the program, and the
program alone, caused the outcomes. This is
a key difference between outcome
measurement and program impact research,
which uses sophisticated statistical methods
and random assignment of participants to
either the program or to a control group.

Levels of Outcomes

Each program is unique and aimed at
achieving a range of different outcomes. As
you are developing your evaluation plan, it is
important to define what you want to evaluate.

In some cases, you may only be interested in
finding out how participants responded to your
teaching style or how satisfied they were with
a program. This is good information to help
you improve the program next time.

In other cases, you want to document the
impact the program had on the participants or
whether the program achieved the targeted
outcomes. Don’t expect to measure impact
from a single workshop or behavior
changes from a program with limited
contact hours (i.e., 45-minute school enrichment
program, 1 1/2-hour training).

The point is to tailor your evaluation to fit the
program. Remember, not all Extension work
needs to be formally evaluated. Be
selective and think about what information
is needed and how it will be used. If you are
interested in outcome evaluation, here’s a
framework for thinking about different levels of
outcomes.

4

Outcomes can be classified under three major
levels: learning, action and impact.

The specific outcomes you can measure are
as follows.

LEARNING LEVEL Immediate
Awareness Created
Knowledge Gained
Attitudes Changed
Skills Developed
Aspirations Sparked

ACTION LEVEL
Behavior Changed
Practice Adopted
Decisions Made
Policies Changed or Adopted
Social Action Initiated

IMPACT LEVEL
Social Impact
Economic Impact
Civic Impact
Environmental Impact Long-Term

It is important to determine the level of
outcome you desire to reach as you plan your
program. Your evaluation should be an
integral part of the program planning process
and not an afterthought.

Remember, outcomes may be positive,
negative, or neutral; intended or unintended.

Program Logic Model

One effective method for linking program
design and evaluation is the program logic
model. A program logic model is a picture of
how your program works – the theory and
assumptions underlying the program. This
model provides a roadmap for your
program, outlining how it is expected to work,
what activities need to come before others,
and how desired outcomes are achieved. In
simple terms, it gives a visual picture of what
inputs and outputs are needed to achieve the
desired outcomes.

INPUTS

What resources and contributions by
Extension and others are needed to achieve
our goals?

• people (staff, partners, volunteers)
• time
• money
• materials
• equipment
• technology

These inputs are converted into

OUTPUTS

What activities do we need to conduct to
ensure our goals are met?

• workshops
• meetings
• publications
• media events
• web site
• test plots
• field days
• projects

Who needs to participate, be involved or
reached?

• characteristics (youth, parents,
leaders, mothers on WIC, etc.)

• number
• their reactions

These outputs are intended to achieve certain

OUTCOMES

These are the changes that occur for children,
youth, families, groups, communities,
organizations, and systems. Outcomes range
from immediate to long-range; from learning to
action to social, economic, and environmental
impact. These are listed in the first column of
this page.

Logic Model for Program Design and Evaluation

Assumptions:
1.
2.
3.

Adapted from E. Taylor-Powell, 1999

S. Barkman and K. Machtmes – Purdue University (revised 2002)

INPUTS OUTPUTS OUTCOMES – IMPACT

Activities Participation

ENVIRONMENT
Influential Factors

What do we need to
achieve our goals?

What do we have
to do to ensure our
goals are met?

Who needs to
– participate?
– be involved?
– be reached?

What do we think
the participants
will know, feel, or
be able to do
after participation
in the program?

How do we think
the participants
will behave or
act differently
after participation
in the program?

What kind of impact
can result if the
participants behave
or act differently after
participation in the
program?

LEARNING ACTION IMPACT

Staff
Volunteers
Time
Money
Materials
Equipment
Technology
Partners

Workshops
Meetings
Camps
Curriculum
Publications
Media
Web Site
Projects
Field Days

Number
Characteristics
Reactions

Awareness
Knowledge
Attitudes
Skills
Aspirations

Behavior
Practice
Decisions
Policies
Social Action

Social
Economic
Civic
Environmental

PROGRAM DESIGN AND PLANNING

MEASURING PROGRAM IMPACT

IMPACT Social. Economic, Environmental, Civic
7. Bennett’s – SEE (Social, Economic, and Environmental)

ACTION Behavior, Practice, Decisions, Policies, Social Action
6. Bennett’s – Practice (patterns of behavior,

procedures or action)

LEARNING Awareness, Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills, Aspirations
5. Bennett’s – KASA (knowledge, attitude, skills,

aspirations)

Reactions People’s reactions to a program (degree or positive or
negative interest in topics addressed, their acceptance of
instructors, and their attraction to the educational methods

4. Bennett’s – Reactions

Participants Number and Characteristics of people involved
3. Bennett’s – Participants

Activities W orkshops, Meetings, Camps, Curriculum, Publications,
Media, W eb Site, Projects, Test Plots, Field Days

2. Bennett’s – Activities

Resources Staff, Volunteers, Time, Money, Materials, Equipment,
Technology, Partners

1. Bennett’s – Activities

OUTCOMES

OUTPUTS

INPUTS

Adapted from Bennett & Rockwell TOP Hierarchy

How Bennett’s TOP Hierarchy Fits Into Logic Model

7

How Does the Logic Model Work?

The logic model is really a sequence that
shows the logical relationship between inputs,
outputs, and outcomes.

IF then IF then IF

INPUTS OUTPUTS OUTCOMES

A logic model displays the chain of events that
will effect changes and achieve your targeted
outcomes. You might think about this as a
series of if-then relationships. Here are
some examples of this relationship.

If the “Have a Healthy Baby program” teaches
about the importance of good nutrition and
avoidance of smoking and drugs for a baby’s
health (outputs), then pregnant teens acquire
the knowledge, change their attitude, and gain
skills to eat more nutritiously (immediate
outcomes). If pregnant teens know about and
want to eat nutritiously, then they will eat
nutritious meals (short-term outcomes). If they
eat more nutritiously, then their baby will be
born healthy (longer-term outcomes.)

If teens receive SERIES training on giving
effective presentations and teaching younger
youth (outputs), then they will acquire the
knowledge and skills to be a good instructor
(immediate outcomes). If teens have the
knowledge and are given the opportunity to
practice teaching, then they will improve their
communication and teaching skills and
become effective instructors (short-term
outcomes).

If the pesticide application training program
teaches farmers how to apply the correct
amount of pesticides per acre (outputs), then
they will gain the knowledge and skills to use
pesticides appropriately (immediate outcomes).
If farmers apply pesticides appropriately, then
pesticide runoff is reduced (short-term
outcomes). If pesticide runoff is reduced, then
the environment and ground water will not be
polluted (longer-term outcomes).

Underlying each of these if-then relationships
are a number of assumptions. Assumptions
are the beliefs we have about the program and
the way we think it will work; principles that are
guiding the program. In addition, you need to
consider the environment (context) in which
this relationship is occurring.

IF then IF then IF

INPUTS OUTPUTS OUTCOMES

Assumptions:
1.
2. Environment
3.

In the first example, there are two major
assumptions:
1. that good nutrition and avoidance of

caffeine, alcohol, cigarettes, and drugs will
produce a healthy baby.

2. that a teen mother’s desire to have a
healthy baby is stronger than the desire to
eat junk food, drink caffeine or alcohol,
smoke, or use drugs.

In the second example, there is one major
assumption:
1. that SERIES training provides all the

information and practice needed to be an
effective instructor.

In the third example, there two major
assumptions:
1. that over application of pesticides on a

field increases the possibility of pesticide
contamination of the ground water.

2. that pesticide runoff pollutes the ground
water and the environment.

When you are developing your logic model,
think about the underlying assumptions.

• Are they realistic and sound?
• What evidence do you have to

support your assumptions?

You also need to think about the environment
(the context and external conditions) in which
the program exists and influences the success
of the program.

8

Why Create a Logic Model?

There are several reasons why you may want
to create a logic model before you begin
implementing your program.

• It can be a tool to use with stakeholders to
build consensus around what a program’s
inputs, outputs (activities and
participation), and outcomes look like.

• It creates a sense of ownership among
stakeholders.

• It helps bring detail to broad, fuzzy goals.
• It shows the “chain of events” that link

inputs to results.
• It summarizes the key elements of your

program and how it is intended to work.
• It clarifies the difference between activities

and outcomes.
• It provides an easy way to monitor your

program’s progress and make needed
changes.

• It helps focus the evaluation.
• It can be used to easily explain the

program to others or funders.
• It can be used in funding proposals.

Benefits to Using a Logic Model

• Helps identify appropriate evaluation
questions.

• Summarizes complex program to
communicate with internal and external
stakeholders.

• Builds underlying rationale and
expectations.

• Identifies gaps in logic and uncertain
assumptions.

Cautions

? The logic model represents a reality that is
somewhat inaccurate:

– programs are not linear
– programs are dynamic interrelationships
that rarely follow a sequential order

? Logic model focuses on expected
outcomes, making it easy to miss
unexpected outcomes.

? There is a challenge of causal attribution
– many factors influence outcomes

(Taylor-Powell, 1999)

Deciding What Outcome(s)

to Measure

Determining what outcome(s) to measure is
not always an easy decision. There is no
required number of outcomes for a program.

• The more immediate the outcome, the

more influence a program generally has
on its achievement. (United Way, 1996)

• Conversely, the farther the outcome

occurs from the program, the less direct
influence a program has over its
achievement and the greater the likelihood
that other, extraneous forces have
intervened. (United Way, 1996)

It is important to determine what the goal of
interest is for you and your stakeholders by
asking the question, “What do you want to
have happen as a result of this program,
curriculum, or activity?” That then becomes
your “targeted outcome(s).”

Checklist for Outcomes

An outcome should meet all three tests.

? Is it reasonable to believe the program can

influence the outcome in a non-trivial way?

? Would measurement of this outcome help

identify program successes and help point
out shortcomings?

? Will the program’s various stakeholders

accept this as a valid outcome of the
program?

Once you have examined each outcome to
see if it meets the above tests, review your
logic model using the checklist on the next
page. Then you are ready to determine how
you will measure your targeted outcomes.

9

Checklist for Your Program Logic Model and Outcomes

Does the Logic Model:

Include a listing of all inputs that will be needed for this program?
(staff, volunteers, time, money, materials, equipment, technology, partners)

Include details of the activities listed?
(duration, days per week, month, etc; number of sessions; contact hours; location,

etc.)

Include a list of the characteristics and intended number of targeted

participants? (youth ages 8-12, pregnant teens, families on welfare, etc.)

Make sequential and logical connections between inputs (activities,

participation), outputs, and outcomes?
( ‘If” and “then” statements are sequential and logical)

Do Targeted Outcome(s):

Help fulfill Extension’s mission?

Represent meaningful benefits or changes for participants?

Seem reasonable as a result of program participants in a non-trivial

way?

Clearly define the intended scope of the program’s influence?

Help educators identify both points of success and problems the

program can correct?

Provide data that is likely to be effective in communicating benefits to

stakeholders?

If all of the above items are checked, then you are ready to specify the
indicators for your outcomes and where and how you will coll

Place your order
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency
Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more