Expert Answer:BUS325 On Boarding Memo

Answer & Explanation:This assignment, is about on-boarding. As I said in the Week 7 announcement, using the textbook is very important. Relying on websites for this topic isn’t sufficient since few go into detail as does the textbook. In other words, if you’re not going to use the textbook, be prepared to do extensive research. Remember, though, the textbook is a required source.Here’s some helpful information. (1) There are three stages in on-boarding – Pre-Entry, Accommodation, and Role Management. These stages are discussed in detail starting on page 182. (2) On pages 195-197 there is an example chart called “Putting it All Together.”The directions are in the Week 7 tab, so make sure you read them thoroughly. For clarity, here are the main parts:Explain why an on-boarding process needs to be created. This would be a short introductory paragraph. This is not a sentence, it’s a paragraph. You must explain why , that’s rationale. Then create an outline of an on-boarding process. Include a brief explanation of each step and explain why it is important. This is the bulk of the memo. Each step can be listed, but it requires a full explanation and rationale for the steps.Summarize what you believe are the two (2) most critical elements to consider when on-boarding in the global environment. This is the final paragraph and needs not only the points you believe are critical, but also why you believe it to be so. These items would be one or two of the stages or items therein.As was noted in the directions, this assignment needs to be in a standard business memo format; the exception being that it needs a cover page and a reference page. Typed, double spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12), with one-inch margins on all sides. If, though, you are not familiar with a standard business format, please check out this website: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/subject_specific_writing/professional_technical_writing/memos/sample_memo.html**ATTACHED IS THE SECTION THAT IS OUTLINES ABOVE. This would need to be used for this assignment**BOOK USING: Lundby, Kyle, Jolton, Jeffrey. Going Global: Practical Applications and Recommendations for HR and OD Professionals in the Global Workplace. [Strayer University Bookshelf]. Retrieved from https://strayer.vitalsource.com/#/books/9780470626…
chapter_7_notes.docx

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Stage 1: Anticipatory or Pre-Entry
Research has shown that the attitudes that newcomers develop toward their new
employer form very early and are relatively stable over time (Bauer & Green, 1994). This
highlights the importance of paying attention to every detail associated with the
candidate selection process as the first stage of on-boarding. New employees begin to
develop an impression of the organization based on the professionalism of interactions
with recruiters and organizational members. Individuals involved in recruiting and
interviewing processes need to provide candidates with a realistic view of the role, the
challenges he or she will likely face, and, most important, a glimpse into the culture of
the organization. They need to make candidates feel comfortable and welcome while
gaining information necessary to make an accurate assessment of the candidates’ skills
and degree of “fit” within the organization.
Structured interviews are a valuable tool for assessing a candidate’s organizational fit;
the results from these interviews can be an indicator of the individual’s success or failure
in role (Lomax, 2001). Structured interviews designed to assess organizational fit should
focus on character traits deemed essential by the company. For individuals moving to
roles outside their home company, traits such as openness to experience, flexibility,
persistence, and empathy have been identified as key predictors of the individual’s
performance in role (McCall & Hollenbeck, 2002).
GlaxoSmithKline has institutionalized a “Candidate Care” model which is a process and
prescribed set of behaviors that applies a customer service model to candidates’
recruitment experiences. Treat prospective employees in the same manner as your
valued customers, not as traditional job applicants. Ensure that all applicants, those
who successfully gain employment and those who do not, have a positive story to share
with others. Lou Manzi, vice president of global recruitment, views GSK’s candidate care
process as a competitive advantage, one that enhances GSK’s reputation as a preferred
employer while increasing the firm’s brand equity.
Practical steps for global hiring managers include the following:

Provide each applicant with a positive and realistic understanding of the
company

Excite them about your brand by clearly and concisely describing what your firm
stands for

Involve people from diverse perspectives (that is, nationalities, functions, tenure)
in the interview process

Don’t overpromise and underdeliver
Stage 2: Accommodation or Organizational Entry
Effective on-boarding practices implemented during the newcomer’s entry into the
organization tap into the individual’s innate motivation to understand and make sense
of his or her new environment. During this phase, three areas require focus:
transactional basics, performance expectations, and initial orientation.
Transactional Basics
The transactional basics truly represent a double-edged sword: when executed well they
are not sufficient to create an effective on-boarding experience, but any lapses here will
destroy even the most comprehensive on-boarding effort.
Post-Offer Acceptance Communication. Communicate frequently with the new employee
after she has accepted the offer to welcome her into the organization. Carefully craft any
formal announcement that will be issued internally or externally to introduce the
successful candidate. Include not just the candidate’s title and background but introduce
the audiences to his mandate: what is he going to bring to the organization? Be sensitive
to cultural norms when announcing new employees or employees transitioning to a new
role. For example, announcements in Western countries may be more detailed and
highlight individuals’ accomplishments whereas Asian cultures may downplay past
successes.
The Move. A sound corporate relocation policy is essential to ensuring a successful
relocation. Though this sounds very basic, it is surprising how many multinational
corporations have vague policies regarding relocation, whether for a new organizational
member or location moves for existing members. The policy needs to be reviewed
frequently to ensure relevance and it should adequately address adaptations and
exceptions. Service providers, such as move management companies, cultural awareness
trainers, language training, and immigration and tax providers, play an important role
in most relocations. Ensure that they provide early and frequent predeparture
communication with the employee to ensure realistic planning for service delivery. It is
the responsibility of the organization, most likely the human resource member of the
on-boarding team, to serve as the point of contact for the employee.
A critical component to successful relocation involves the employee’s family unit. A now
commonly known statistic cites lack of adaptability by the employee’s spouse or partner
as the numberone reason for assignment failures (see, for example, Frazee, 1998,
Lomax, 2001; McCall & Hollenbeck, 2002). A 1999 Global Relocation Trends survey
reported data from 177 companies with more than 50,000 U.S. expatriates on active
assignments overseas; more than 50% of the companies surveyed listed the following
family challenges as critical:

family adjustment

children’s education

spouse or partner resistance
• spouse or partner career
Despite the preponderance of evidence and common sense suggesting that early
identification and adequately addressing family challenges will establish a comfort zone
allowing the employee to concentrate on work, very few companies involve the
employee’s family in screening and/or selection decisions (Global Relocation Trends,
1999). (See Chapter 12 on Expatriation for more information.)
Day 1 Experience. Planning for the employee’s first day in the new environment is again
very basic, but often overlooked. Take advantage of the employee’s enthusiasm on Day 1;
make the newcomer feel comfortable and trusting that this assignment is the right one
for her. Ensure that there is a plan for greeting the employee upon arrival and assistance
with building access and security as necessary. Also ensure that someone is accountable
for establishing work station basics including computer, e-mail and intranet access,
telephone. The “Day 1” checklist shown in Figure 7.2 provides further examples of
important items to ensure the employee experiences a positive Day 1.
Performance Expectations
Ensure the employee’s line manager is available during the employee’s initial arrival at
the organization to clarify accountabilities and establish priorities. This needs to be an
ongoing dialogue, but the line manager sets the stage on Day 1 for a successful
relationship with the new employee. Schedule a two-hour block of time for the line
manager and new employee to meet on Day 1. As Gallop’s research has shown, the
employee’s line manager plays the most important role in influencing employee
engagement and performance (Buckingham & Coffman, 1999).
The line manager’s role in effectively establishing performance expectations for the new
hire includes the following:

Provide an overview of the function’s role in the business and its relationship to
other functions


Review the role description and agree on priorities and timetables
Agree on how performance will be judged, who will be involved in evaluating
performance, and how performance will be rewarded

Define development goals

Set up periodic informal evaluations
Some organizations highlight the critical role of the line manager in effectively onboarding new hires by including metrics such as the percentage of time dedicated to onboarding efforts and turnover rates as part of line managers’ performance ratings.
3.Orientation
According to a survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, 83% of
companies report the use of a formal orientation program for new employees.
Unfortunately, the usefulness of such programs from the perspective of the new
employee varies significantly. Some programs focus solely on communicating factual
information about pay and benefits, company rules and policies, and completing
paperwork. Most of these activities can be accomplished more efficiently and effectively
with supporting technology, allowing the employee to access the information when
necessary.
Table 7.4 highlights some of the common problems associated with orientation
programs from the perspective of new employees (Werner & DeSimone, 2006).
Best practice companies approach new employees’ orientation in very different ways.
They design orientation programs that concentrate on emotional takeaways and many
identify a peer coach or “buddy” to help orient the newcomer. The peer coach is
preferably the same level as the new employee and has tenure of at least six months with
the organization. In addition, the peer coach should:

Prepare a list of what he or she would have wanted to know about the
organization when he or she first entered

Be available for 15 minutes per day during newcomer’s first week

Provide feedback and encouragement to the newcomer

Provide guidance on expanding networks within the company
Serve as a sounding board and informal source of information for questions
related to policies, processes, work rules, and corporate or local style and norms,
for example.
In terms of more formal orientation sessions, best practice companies use the time to
describe the company’s history and values and help employees feel connected to the
company’s business strategy and financial goals. As Diana Oreck, vice president of RitzCarlton’s Global Learning and Leadership Center said, “People don’t remember what
you said or what you did but they always remember what they felt.” Southwest Airlines
is an example of another company that focuses its orientation program on creating a
positive emotional experience. The emotions and feelings elicited in effective orientation
programs include welcome, comfort, security, pride, excitement, confidence. In addition
to sharing key information about the company (such as history, values, strategy,
organizational structure, and so on), consider inviting respected employees and leaders
to share client success stories. These examples can give newcomers a sense of
accomplishment knowing they are working for a company that is respected in the
marketplace. In addition, stories relayed from current employees and managers can
help new employees begin to visualize how they can help contribute to organizational
success.

It is customary for orientation programs to be implemented locally. In more advanced
global organizations, common content provided from the corporate group is
incorporated into local orientation sessions. Examples of this common content might
include a welcome message from the CEO, visions for future, and high-level description
of market results and strategic drivers. Stories from senior leaders from around the
world may be highlighted through videotaped messages. Depending on the level and
role and number of new employees, some organizations may follow a local orientation
with a global assimilation event (often held at the company headquarters location). This
kind of event is designed to catalyze relationships with senior leaders and with other
new employees on a global scale and offers a nice transition from the Accommodation
stage of on-boarding to the final Role Management stage.
Stage 3: Role Management
Building and managing relationships is the focus of the role management stage of onboarding. This stage takes time, although the combination of the right individual and
efficient organizational practices can accelerate the process. The value of establishing
solid relationships with the employee’s new manager, direct reports, peers, and other
organizational members is well documented. Research has consistently shown that
people rely on other people to get the information they need to get their jobs done
(Cross, 2007). Newcomers are instantly at a disadvantage as they are on the periphery of
the web of relationships within the organization. Organizational practices can facilitate
and support newcomers to build effective relationships with their manager, team, and
larger group of stakeholders.
Line Manager
The relationship with his manager is one of the most significant in an employee’s career
(Buckingham & Coffman, 1999). An employee’s immediate manager is responsible for
performance management and career development processes, as well as providing
ongoing coaching and feedback. Managers need to be involved in every stage of the onboarding experience, but some organizations focus specific attention on ensuring that
line managers are skilled in working with new employees to establish objectives, review
progress, and provide constructive feedback designed to facilitate the employee’s
transition into the organization. Further, the line manager plays an instrumental role in
helping the employee build important work relationships by providing appropriate
introductions and, most important, in carefully considering the first assignment for the
new employee. Initial work projects should require assistance from colleagues,
especially those in different functions and departments. Avoid assigning initial projects
that involve working with external partners or suppliers. When line managers review
progress with the newcomer they should ask not only ‘‘What have you accomplished?”
but also ‘‘Who have you established relationships with?”
In global organizations, especially at senior levels, it is likely that the newcomer’s
immediate manager is not located in close physical proximity. Managing virtual
relationships has been touched upon in other chapters (see for example, Chapters
1 and 4), but it is important to highlight here as well. New employees who have remote
managers need to assume 100% of the responsibility for establishing and maintaining
the relationship.
Find a way to spend time together face-to-face, especially in the early days. It’s
recommended that the new employee’s line manager travel to the newcomer’s location
in the first week to facilitate introductions and establish objectives. Also agree on
regular times and means for checking-in with each other; ideally this will be weekly or
biweekly during the initial transition period and over the phone (not via e-mail).
Stage 3: Role Management
Building and managing relationships is the focus of the role management stage of onboarding. This stage takes time, although the combination of the right individual and
efficient organizational practices can accelerate the process. The value of establishing
solid relationships with the employee’s new manager, direct reports, peers, and other
organizational members is well documented. Research has consistently shown that
people rely on other people to get the information they need to get their jobs done
(Cross, 2007). Newcomers are instantly at a disadvantage as they are on the periphery of
the web of relationships within the organization. Organizational practices can facilitate
and support newcomers to build effective relationships with their manager, team, and
larger group of stakeholders.
Line Manager
The relationship with his manager is one of the most significant in an employee’s career
(Buckingham & Coffman, 1999). An employee’s immediate manager is responsible for
performance management and career development processes, as well as providing
ongoing coaching and feedback. Managers need to be involved in every stage of the onboarding experience, but some organizations focus specific attention on ensuring that
line managers are skilled in working with new employees to establish objectives, review
progress, and provide constructive feedback designed to facilitate the employee’s
transition into the organization. Further, the line manager plays an instrumental role in
helping the employee build important work relationships by providing appropriate
introductions and, most important, in carefully considering the first assignment for the
new employee. Initial work projects should require assistance from colleagues,
especially those in different functions and departments. Avoid assigning initial projects
that involve working with external partners or suppliers. When line managers review
progress with the newcomer they should ask not only ‘‘What have you accomplished?”
but also ‘‘Who have you established relationships with?”
In global organizations, especially at senior levels, it is likely that the newcomer’s
immediate manager is not located in close physical proximity. Managing virtual
relationships has been touched upon in other chapters (see for example, Chapters
1 and 4), but it is important to highlight here as well. New employees who have remote
managers need to assume 100% of the responsibility for establishing and maintaining
the relationship.
Find a way to spend time together face-to-face, especially in the early days. It’s
recommended that the new employee’s line manager travel to the newcomer’s location
in the first week to facilitate introductions and establish objectives. Also agree on
regular times and means for checking-in with each other; ideally this will be weekly or
biweekly during the initial transition period and over the phone (not via e-mail).
Direct Reports
A process that has been used successfully at GE for years is focused on relationships
between the new employee and his or her direct reports. GE refers to this as the New
Manager Assimilation Process and similar processes are used at many global companies
including Citigroup and Honeywell. A New Manager Assimilation Process centers
around three areas:
1. Relationship Management: setting the foundation by clarifying roles, relationships
of team, work climate, trust, and openness
2. Boundary Management: identifying critical priorities of the business,
understanding challenges and opportunities, and stakeholders
3. Leadership Action: strategy structure, support, follow-up actions of manager and
team
The NMAP can take anywhere from a half day to one-and-ahalf days, and successful
programs have a subsequent follow-up session to check in and evaluate how things are
going. The followup normally takes place four to six months after the NMAP. In its most
basic form, data is collected from the new manager’s team, summarized, and returned to
the new manager who, together with a coach, reviews the questions and prepares for a
face-to-face feedback session with the new team. Questions may include, but do not
need to be limited to, these examples:

What do we already know about [New Manager]?


What don’t we know but would like to know about [New Manager]?
What are our concerns about [New Manager]?

What do we want most from [New Manager]?

What does [New Manager] need to know about us?

What are the major challenges we face as business, function, or team?
During the feedback session, the new manager responds to the input and the questions
gathered from the team. He or she engages in dialogue with the team and agrees on
actions. A summary of the feedback session is reviewed three to six months later.
The success of any New Manager Assimilation Process is dependent upon an
experienced, trained, and skilled facilitator. Prework for these processes varies but may
include an assessment of team learning style and communication style, and could also
include a leadership style assessment for the new manager.
At Citigroup the NMAP was focused on the following outcomes:
1. Enable a smooth transition for the new manager and the manager’s team
2. Create a dedicated space for open dialogue and to share information
3. Build relationships for effective work flow by clarify …
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