Expert answer:ENT101 Suffolk University Innovative Micro Machine

Solved by verified expert:According to the material of the given imm, write the BSAM and SWOT of imm.And here is the BSAM & SWOT Template
bsam_swot_template_v2019.docx

case_2_imm_compensation_sept_28_2018.docx

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[STUDENT NAME]
[Date]
BUSINESS FOUNDATIONS (ENT101 Section [Letter])
SWOT Analysis: [Case Name]
Strengths
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Weaknesses
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Opportunities
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Threats
1.
2.
3.
4.
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1
Updated 07/2019
[STUDENT NAME]
[Date]
BUSINESS FOUNDATIONS (ENT101 Section [Letter])
BSAM OUTLINE: [Case Name]
When and Where are we in Time? (Firm location, during what time frame does the case take place):


Who are the Stakeholders? (Group them into categories and list them all on the same line by category):





What Industry does firm compete in? What is the Target Market and Market Segments of the firm?:





Who is the Competition? (Group them into categories and list them all on the same line by category):





Assessment (Key Symptoms and causes):
Analysis (The ONE Primary Problem that encompasses most or all of the key symptoms):

2
Updated 07/2019
[STUDENT NAME]
[Date]
BUSINESS FOUNDATIONS (ENT101 Section [Letter])
Explain Best Alternatives and How They Will Help “Solve” the Singular Primary Problem Above:
Alternative #1:
Alternative #2:
Alternative #3:
Implementation Action Plan: Describe the research you must do to answer the following questions about
EACH alternative:
• How could it be implemented?
• How much will it cost short & long-term? (Make educated assumptions about cost!)
• How quickly can it be completed?
• How risky is it? How easy is it to do?
• How well does it solve primary problem (estimate a percentage)?
• What are the consequences of each alterative? – Think through EVERYTHING!
Alternative #1:
Alternative #2:
Alternative #3:
3
Updated 07/2019
Can Innovative Micro Machines (IMM) Innovate its Compensation in Time?
Amanda Zhou, president of a small to medium-sized semiconductor business, Innovative Micro
Machines (IMM), was reviewing the technical specs for the company’s latest computer chips when
she heard a knock on the metal door frame to her office. She motioned for Peter Patel, VP of
Human Resources, to enter through the open door and asked “What’s up Peter? You look worried.”
Peter jumped right to the point, “Cecelia Ruiz AND Jonathan Jones gave their two week notice
today. I tried to talk them out of it and even encouraged them to speak with you before handing in
their resignation, but they both got recruited by our biggest competitors.” Amanda asked if they
were headed to Intel and Nvidia. Peter nodded, “Cecelia was recruited to head a team working on
the next generation GeForce graphics processor for Nvidia’s gaming division, and Jonathan’s been
recruited to help Intel fix the security problems with their latest processors.” Amanda sighed. She
liked them both and would be sad to see them go, “do we know why they’re leaving?” Peter offered,
“Money, I guess. Cecelia and Jonathan wouldn’t say but I know that Intel and Nvidia pay more
than IMM does. We seem to be losing even more employees to them this year over last year and
it’s only October. We really need to stop this turnover or we won’t be able to grow.”
Amanda, still disheartened, acknowledged, “You’re right, I wanted to wait until the end of the year
to see how sales were going, but our last nine quarters exceeded profit estimates and we seem to
be on track to do it again this quarter. We can’t keep losing our strongest performers and hope to
surpass our revenue targets. Put some numbers and information together on our recruiting and
retention trends and we’ll discuss them tomorrow.” Peter agreed and quickly made his way down
the hall.
Amanda sighed again as she turned toward the window to take in the peaceful fall landscape
surrounding the office building. She watched as employees continued to roll into the parking lot
even though it was approaching 10:30am. She smiled as she remembered how happy employees
were when, three years ago, she explained the implementation of a flexible schedule which allowed
employees to avoid the awful Boston-area traffic and work from home two days a week. The
schedule also allowed employees to start their days at the office at a convenient time for them and
their team as long as it was before 11am – that way most meetings could still be conducted in
person between 11am and 3pm.
She turned back to the beautiful chip schematics at her desk. “These chips will change the whole
industry. They’re much faster than anything else one can buy, they cost half as much to make as
our latest models, and they’re the most secure chip,” she thought to herself. “Now we just need to
make sure they hit the market on time.”
To Better Understand the Future, One Must Look at the Past and Present
IMM was founded 30 years ago by three MIT graduate students on the edge of Great Brook Farm
State Park just outside of Boston with the goal of designing and manufacturing the best computer
chips in the world. The company faced formidable competition from more established companies
like Intel and AMD before it even designed its first chip but they believed they had a new, better
way of making computer chips that would make them faster than anything else on the market. The
gamble paid off and IMM quickly hired 40 employees and had a strong IPO in its 5th year allowing
Page 1 of 4
the company to raise the capital it needed for R&D and expansion. The success lasted for 10 more
years, and then several large international chip manufactures entered the marketspace with slower
but much cheaper products. Over the next 9 years the company’s board of directors had trouble
keeping a CEO in place for more than 2-3 years until they hired Amanda Zhou away from Intel
five years ago.
Amanda immigrated to the US (Detroit) with her parents when she was 3 years old. Her mother
was a chemical engineer and her father was an automotive engineer. Amanda showed great interest
in learning how things worked from an early age, often taking apart her siblings’ toys or household
appliances like the toaster and vacuum cleaner. She built her first computer by age 10 from specs
published in a hobby magazine. She graduated from MIT with a Ph.D. in electrical engineering
and was immediately recruited by Intel. She quickly became known for her excellent technical and
research skills. Intel covered her tuition for an MBA to help her gain increasingly more
sophisticated business skills. Within 6 years of joining Intel, Amanda was promoted to VP of
Semiconductor R&D – a demanding role that required her engineering and business expertise.
Soon after her promotion she gained a positive reputation in the industry. Two years later IMM
recruited her to be their next CEO, hoping that she could make the company profitable again.
Over the last 5 years, Amanda implemented several programs to make her employees time at work
more enjoyable. In addition to the flexible schedule, she had quarterly raffles where employees
could win a new cell phone or gaming system. Moreover, she personally met with every employee
one-on-one during the recruitment process and each year afterwards to offer advice for how the
individual could advance at IMM. Additionally, Amanda maintains IMM’s industry leading
retirement program, and four years ago increased employee (and their families) dental and health
benefits while most other companies decreased theirs.
Amanda also implemented many innovative social and environmental initiatives at the company
which strengthened the company’s reputation among customers and investors. Amanda’s
reputation for being a fair, approachable, and employee-focused leader preceded her such that she
was always mobbed at industry events she attended. Within a year of her taking over IMM, the
company started getting listed as one of the 10 best companies to work for in Massachusetts and
in the top 100 within the entire US. While all of Amanda’s initiatives took time to be implemented,
employees seemed proud to work at IMM, and within two years the company climbed out of the
red ink it had been bleeding for the previous 7 quarters. Today, IMM has exceeded Wall Street
analysts’ profit expectations each of the last nine quarters. See Appendix A for some additional
financial information.
Was There a Problem?
As Peter quickly rounded the corner to Amanda’s office he heard her yell, “Come on in,” even
though he was still 8 feet away. “How does she do that?” he wondered. Peter sat down next to
Amanda at the small table in her office and handed her a summary of HR data he was able to put
together in the short time-frame. (See the Appendix B.)
Upon review of the data, Amanda and Peter agreed that there definitely was a problem recruiting
and retaining employees in hard-to-fill roles. Amanda worried whether IMM, which was much
smaller than Intel and Nvidia, could afford to match the pay of its lead competitors. “Surely there
Page 2 of 4
are some other options, right?” she asked. Peter explained that there are four main components to
a complete employee rewards system that Amanda could consider: (1) direct compensation (i.e.
salary/wages); (2) indirect compensation such as healthcare and retirement benefits; (3) employee
development opportunities; and (4) characteristics of the work environment.
Even though IMM never paid as much as its competitors, it didn’t have any problems recruiting
or retaining high performing employees until this year. Amanda had been making strides to ensure
that the company’s culture was strong and that employees were doing interesting and engaging
work. In fact, Amanda was certain that the people who joined and stayed at IMM were clearly
motivated by something more than just financial compensation because they probably could have
received more elsewhere when they were initially on the job market or within their first year if
they weren’t happy. Most engineers came from the same top-notch engineering program as
Amanda and, like her, were techies who lived for the intellectual challenge of building something
truly innovative.
Amanda’s hiring forecast showed that the company would need to fill 30-40 new positions next
year on top of replacing the employees who already left this year if it wanted to keep innovating
and growing. As she reviewed Peter’s documents again, she realized she hadn’t been doing enough
to motivate and reward the energetic and dedicated employees she and the board depended on to
keep IMM ahead of the competition. Amanda knew she had to implement some changes at the
company but wanted to make sure they would be considered fair by new recruits as well as longterm employees. She wanted to make sure the plan was not only creative and cost-effective but
also ethical and legal before she brought it to the board of directors for approval. After Peter left,
Amanda made calls to the top compensation consultation firms in Boston asking for their best
recommendations.
Appendix A
Last 5 Years: Summary of Financial Information
Stock Price (average)
Sales Revenue
Expenses
Year-toDate
$18
$60 M
$34 M
Last Year
$15
$50 M
$35 M
2 Years
Ago
$10
$40 M
$35 M
3 Years
Ago
$6
$25 M
$35 M
4 Years
Ago
$5
$20 M
$35 M
2 Years
Ago
1
9
1
6
3 Years
Ago
0
8
2
5
4 Years
Ago
3
7
2
5
5 Years
Ago
$5
$20 M
$30 M
Appendix B
Last 5 Years: Employee Turnover
Executives
Engineers
Office and legal staff
Assemblers
Year-toDate
0
20
1
10
Last Year
0
10
2
7
Page 3 of 4
Last 5 Years: Successful Employee Hiring
Executives
Engineers
Office and legal staff
Assemblers
Year-toDate
0
15
2
8
Last Year
1
25
2
7
2 Years
Ago
0
22
2
5
3 Years
Ago
1
13
2
8
4 Years
Ago
2
8
1
4
2 Years
Ago
10
138
21
32
3 Years
Ago
11
125
20
33
4 Years
Ago
10
120
20
30
Last 5 Years: Employee Totals
Executives
Engineers
Office and legal staff
Assemblers
Year-toDate
11
148
22
30
Last Year
11
153
21
32
Last 5 Years: Average Estimated Pay Difference from NVIDIA and Intel
Executives
Engineers
Office and legal staff
Assemblers
Year-to- Last
Date
Year
2 Years
Ago
3 Years Ago
4 Years Ago
0 to -5%
-13% to
-20%
-5% to
-7%
-10%
0 to -5%
-10% to
-12%
-5% to
-7%
-7% to
-9%
0 to -5%
-5% to -8%
0 to -5%
-5% to -7%
-5% to -7%
-5% to -7%
-5% to -7%
-5% to -7%
0 to -5%
-10% to
-13%
-5% to
-7%
-7% to
-10%
Page 4 of 4

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